Is trophy hunting the only thing saving Africa’s wildlife?

An African hunting expo drew protesters and sparse crowds Saturday. (c) 2016 Towhey.com

According to York Region Police,
Inside, about 19 hunting & safari vendors had set up booths for a sparse crowd.  Organizers said attendance Saturday was lighter than hoped and that some of the attendees may have been scared off by the morning protest.  About six people wandered the booths while I was there late in the day, but they looked like serious shoppers – spending upwards of 30 minutes talking to some vendors and taking down detailed information.  None of the prospective clients was willing to talk to Newstalk1010.

A sparse crowd browsed through 19 hunting & safari outfitters booths.
A sparse crowd browsed through 19 hunting & safari outfitters booths.

Animal Justice spokesperson Camille Labchuk described trophy hunting to CP24 as a business “built on the brutal killing of innocent animals.”

Prices for hunting safaris in Africa.
Prices for hunting safaris in Africa.

Are Canadians just too squeamish?

Those in the industry argue trophy hunting is responsible for the successful return of animal conservation in southern Africa.  In Zimbabwe, money raised from trophy hunting pays for the protection of other animals from poaching.  About two per cent of each wildlife species in that country is allocated for all forms of hunting, including trophy hunting, according to Louis Muller, Chairman of the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association. “Trophy hunting two per cent of the animals pays for the protection of the other 98 per cent of the animals.”  The anti-hunting lobby provides no financial support for anti-poaching efforts in Zimbabwe, according to Muller.

The show was forced to relocate twice when two different venue managers cancelled their contracts with the organizers, citing “safety reasons” after receiving complaints and, allegedly, threats from animal rights activists.

The show continues Sunday until 4 pm at the Premier Place Banquet Venue in Vaughan.  

The discussion begins at 2 pm Sunday on Newstalk 1010

We’ll discuss the topic and ask if Canadians are just too squeamish about hunting on the Mark Towhey show at 2pm Sunday, January 17 on Newstalk1010.  Listen online at newstalk1010.com.  Join the conversation at 416.872.1010.

Mark Oberem, Izilo Hunting Safaris, on the effect of trophy hunting on species at risk

 

Louis Muller, Chairman of the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association, on how much game is hunted in Zimbabwe and how wildlife protection activities are funded:

 

Muller on what happens if Trophy Hunting was stopped in Zimbabwe: